Academic Distinction Programs

Academic Distinctions have been developed at WMed to give students the opportunity to pursue and be recognized for areas of interest and scholarship. Each Academic Distinction includes about 30 – 40 hours of curriculum which could include electives, parallel co–curricular work, and scholarship in the form of publication or project. This could be research for publication, curricular development project, quality improvement project, or a project in conjunction with an international trip. Academic Distinctions can be pursued at any stage in the curriculum provided the student maintains good academic standing.

  • Advocacy and Leadership in Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Distinction Program

    Contact: Michael Busha, MD, MBA
    mike.busha@wmed.edu

    Patient safety and quality improvement are two areas within the construct of Health System Science which provide significant opportunity for personal development across the medical school’s competency domains. They are also areas in which skills, advocacy, and leadership are highly needed across the continuum of care. This academic distinction seeks to identify students with a particular passion for patient safety and quality improvement and foster their personal development and skills in promotion of future advocates and leaders.

    Purpose

    To develop future leaders in healthcare with a foundational knowledge of the core tenets and industry history in patient safety and quality improvement.  To foster skill development in the areas of patient safety and quality improvement through meaningful engagement in individual and system projects.  To provide mentorship for leadership skill development.

    Objectives

    • Develop baseline knowledge for:
      • Continuous quality improvement
      • Institute of Medicine dimensions of healthcare quality
      • Value of ‘improvement science’
      • Model for Improvement (IHI)
      • AIM statements
      • Process, outcome and balancing measures
      • Change concepts and PDSA
      • Run charts, Control charts and other measurement tools
      • Key phases of QI project
      • Culture of safety
      • Reliability of systems
      • Concepts of Error and Harm
      • Human factor principles
      • Teams and patient safety
      • Leadership in healthcare
         
    • Apply knowledge through participation in development, deployment and evaluation of a patient safety/quality improvement initiative.
    • Assess and reflect on leadership dynamics and how to thoughtfully apply strategies to promote change.


    Application Process and Eligibility

    Eligibility is open to all students in good academic standing at WMed. The Program will not discriminate based on race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familial status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance. 

    Application Deadline

    Students must enroll prior to the end of their third year of medical school.

    Requirements

    Applications are accepted through a portal link through Educational Affairs.  All applicants meet with the thread director for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement prior to acceptance into program to review commitment, requirements and expectations. 

    • Complete the following Modules
      • Institute for Healthcare Improvement Basic Certificate in Quality and Safety 
        • Quality Improvement 101:  Introduction to Health Care Improvement 
        • Quality Improvement 102:  How to Improve with the Model for Improvement 
        • Quality Improvement 103:  Testing and Measuring Changes with PDSA Cycles 
        • Quality Improvement 104:  Interpreting Data: Run Charts, Control Charts, and  Other Measurement Tools 
        • Quality Improvement 105:  Leading Quality Improvement 
        • Patient Safety 101:  Introduction to Patient Safety 
        • Patient Safety 102:  From Error to Harm 
        • Patient Safety 103:  Human Factors and Safety 
        • Patient Safety 104:  Teamwork and Communication in a Culture of Safety 
        • Patient Safety 105:  Responding to Adverse Events 
        • Triple Aim for Populations 101:  Introduction to the Triple Aim for Populations 
        • Person and Family-Centered Care: 101:  Introduction to Person- and Family-Centered Care 
        • Leadership 101:  Introduction to Health Care Leadership 
    • Reflection Exercise on Institute of Medicine’s publication To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System from Institute of Medicine (1999) 
      • 3 page minimum to director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement thread 
    • Reflection Exercise on Free from Harm: Accelerating Patient Safety Improvement Fifteen Years after To Err Is Human from National Patient Safety Foundation (2015) 
      • 3 page minimum to director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement thread 
    • Participation in Patient Safety/Quality Improvement project 
      • arranged/approved through director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement thread 
    • Participation in leadership mentoring  
      • arranged/approved through director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement thread 
    • Scholarship deliverable: 
      Either:
      • Acceptance and delivery of a research day or conference poster/presentation or peer reviewed publication of project or
      • Development of an asynchronous curriculum module in an area of Patient Safety and/or Quality Improvement utilizing Articulate with anticipated utilization in UME and/or CE curriculum (must be approved through director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement thread). 


    Tracking of Student Progress and Feedback 

    Students will meet with the distinction director at least once per term. For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.

    When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.

    Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.

  • Clinical Informatics Distinction Program

    Contact: Shamsi Berry, PhD, MS
    shamsi.berry@wmed.edu

    Clinical Informatics (CI) is the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health by physicians (adapted from Kulikowski et al., 2012). The CI Distinction focuses on knowledge and skill development in the following content areas of medicine, technology and human-social theories.

    Our distinction global objectives are:

    • Appraise key fundamentals of decision support science and development of Clinical Decision Support rules.
    • Describe use of precision medicine to personal and population health.
    • Explain and apply data management theories and applications.
    • Summarize research data and database regulations.
    • Experiment with Clinical Informatics skills to construct and develop data sets and visualizations.
    • Explore careers in Clinical informatics and explain career pathways.
       

    The Program offers interested students an opportunity to:

    • Expand the breadth of their knowledge across clinical informatics content areas
    • Participate in research across these content areas
    • Learn skills and techniques used in Clinical Informatics
       

    Eligibility is open to all students in good academic standing at WMed in their first year of medical school. Electives begin in the second half of the first year. The Program will not discriminate based on race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familial status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance.

    Application Deadline

    Students must be in their first year of medical school.

    Please contact Shamsi Berry, PhD, with any questions at shamsi.berry@wmed.edu.

    Tracking of Student Progress and Feedback 

    Students will meet with the distinction director at least once per term. For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.

    When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.

    Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.

    More Information

  • Global and Public Health Distinction Program

    Contacts: Cheryl Dickson, MD, MPH | Priscilla Woodhams, MD
    cheryl.dickson@wmed.edu | priscilla.woodhams@wmed.edu

    Public health is defined as “the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts of society” (Acheson, 1988; WHO). As a multidisciplinary field, public health may be understood to incorporate numerous disciplines, including but not limited to global health. Global healthcare delivery similarly is defined as the effective, equitable provision to a population of quality services and technologies that preserve health and that treat and manage illness to the world's most vulnerable populations (Rhatigan 2016). Global Health similarly places priority on improving health and achieving health equity for people across the world with an emphasis on population-based prevention while also embracing individual curative and rehabilitative clinical care (Koplan, 2009).

    Purpose

    This Academic Distinction provides additional training longitudinally with the goal of adopting such tenants into practice, to provide equitable and thoughtful care to individuals, communities, and populations with an understanding that public health and global health equity is fundamental to medicine and to combating morbidity and mortality from altering perspectives.  

    Objectives

    • Identify challenges in healthcare delivery in under-resourced and marginalized populations
    • Correctly employ the technical language and terms of art common in professional discourse regarding global and public health
    • Identify the social risk factors to which marginalized and under-resourced populations are susceptible and that lead to inequities in health outcomes
    • Use knowledge and understanding of global and public health concepts to design and implement a project that addresses one or more selected health inequities


    Application Process and Eligibility

    Eligibility is open to all students in good academic standing at WMed. The Program will not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familiar status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance. 

    Students are eligible to apply at any point prior to the end of third year. This process will include an intent to participate form including a plan that may change as needed. Should participants need to drop from the Program due to eligibility concerns or otherwise, they may re-apply at any time.  

    Application Deadline

    Student must apply prior to the end of their third year.

    Requirements

    • Students will complete at minimum one deliverable product which can include but is not limited to a scholarly project (original research, review article or book chapter, etc.), professional presentation (research posters, oral presentations, publications, etc.), health product (pamphlet, educational material, etc.) or device creation. Students much have approval of deliverable product by Distinction lead faculty.
    • Students must complete 5 of the following 7 requirements:
      • Completion of the longitudinal global health elective series (GLOH 7110 Selected Topics in Global Health-Section 1 or 2)
        • Completion of this requirement as part of the Program may be through enrollment as a pre-clinical elective or equivalent participation in this course at any point during medical school. 
      • Participation in a global health equity project
        • Approval of project through Global Health faculty lead, Dr. Woodhams
      • Completion of two available online courses (Global Health I, Global Health II). Formal enrollment through the Registrar is required.
      • Attendance at a total of 10 Global Health Grand Rounds
      • Completion of GLOH 7515 Systematic Evaluation of Health Iniquity. Formal enrollment through the Registrar is required.
      • Participation in a local public health project
        • Approval of project through Public Health faculty lead, Dr. Dickson
      • Presentation of a global and/or public health project
        • Approval of project through either Dr. Dickson or Dr. Woodhams


    To be verified for completion of options B, F, or G, the student must fill out a submission form and attach supporting documentation. Documents such as a copy of the project, an itinerary showing the presentation at a conference, or another confirmatory document can be accepted.

    Student Progress and Feedback

    Interested students meet periodically with lead faculty advisors at minimum twice per year after enrolling to discuss progress, offer mentorship, and provide feedback.

    Students will meet with the distinction director at least once per term. For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.

    When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.

    Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.

  • Interprofessional Focus in Community Health Distinction Program

    Contact: Kristine Gibson, MD
    kristine.Gibson@wmed.edu

    The Interprofessional Focus in Community Health Distinction program at Western Michigan University Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine (WMed) is as a longitudinal curriculum in which eligible students may enroll prior to the start of the clinical applications phase of their medical education and graduate with a Distinction in Interprofessional Focus in Community Health.   

    Asynchronous interprofessional didactic learning modules during the first year of the program focus on an introduction to interprofessional collaborative practice, behavioral health integration, social determinants of health, cultural competency, practice transformation, and current and emerging health issues. Application of these skills and practices occur during your Family and Community Medicine core clerkship. For students interest in a rural focus, placements may also be targeted during pediatrics, medicine, surgery, and emergency medicine.   

    The second year of the program focuses on interprofessional practice transformation, quality improvement targeting patient safety and change initiatives, and community impact projects.   Students will work in teams during the second year of the program and didactics will utilize both asynchronous and synchronous learning activities. Students will engage in personal reflection and develop teamwork assessment skills. Clinical electives during your fourth year allows participants of the Program to increase knowledge, develop expertise, clarify values, and develop capacity to contribute to communities in need.

    Purpose

    Designed to enhance clinical practice readiness skills to work in rural and underserved urban settings, this two-year program implements interdisciplinary curricula using clinical settings, didactic interprofessional learning modules, behavioral health integration, social determinants of health, cultural competency, practice transformation, and current and emerging health issues. This programs is a mix of online training and community-based learning in rural and underserved communities throughout Southwest Michigan interfacing with other health professionals including Dentists, Public Health professionals, Social Workers, Nurses, Occupational Therapists, Pharmacists, and Physician Assistants with the goal of obtaining skills and practices in the field provides an interprofessional lens for community health to increase knowledge, develop expertise, clarify values, and contribute to communities in need.

    Application Process and Eligibility

    Eligibility is open to all students in good academic standing at WMed. The Program will not discriminate based on race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familial status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance. 

    Students are eligible to apply at any point before starting the Clinical Applications phase of the curriculum. This process will requires completion of the intent to participate form, including their residency plans, which may be updated as needed. Should participants need to exit the Program due to academic eligibility or other concerns, they may re-apply.

    Requirements

    AHEC Scholars Program participation: The Interprofessional Focus in Community Health Distinction is a 2-year longitudinal curriculum that requires 80 hours of effort per academic year during the clinical applications phase. Forty hours of qualifying clinical and community-based training and 40 hours of didactic curriculum must be completed by the end of core clerkships.  The required 40 hours of clinical training during the third-year is accomplished through the Family and Community Medicine core clerkship with additional rural opportunities in Medicine, Pediatrics and Surgery. The 40 hours of asynchronous online learning is completed within the Moodle platform and utilizes the Year 1 learning modules which have been developed for the AHEC (Area Health Education Center) Scholars Program. 


    Goals of the second year of the Program transition from knowledge acquisition to knowledge application and sustainable skill development. There will be fewer online modules in Year 2 with more of an emphasis on working in teams. Didactics include the second year AHEC modules and students may choose any clinical specialty to complete their 40-hours of training in a rural or underserved urban community. Interprofessional teams will participate in two separate practice transformation projects, each with a different focus.   

    Year 1: Modules – Completed During Core Clerkships

    • Introduction folder 
      • Introduction ppt to the learning activities 
      • Pre-assessment questionnaire 
      • Integration of public health and primary care 
      • Status of Michigan's Health 
      • Health promotion and disease prevention 
      • Check-ins and clinical log x 4
         
    • Interprofessional practice folder
      • Interprofessional practice learning activity
         
    • Social Determinants of Health folder
      • Social determinants of health learning assignment 1 
      • Social determinants of health root cause analysis assignment 2
          
    • Cultural competency folder
      • Cultural competency domain assignment
         
    • Behavioral Health Integration folder
      • Motivational Interviewing Learning assignment
         
    • Emerging Issues folder – years 1 and 2
      • Substance Abuse – SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) 
      • Understanding and implementing health literacy 
      • Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid abuse 
      • Health Communication, Risk Communication and Crisis Communication: COVID 19 Testing and Surveillance Examples
         

    Year 2

    • Clinical Practice Transformation Projects
      • QI and other clinical change initiatives focused on interprofessional clinical practice.  
      • Population health initiatives such as community-based activities: health fairs, health education, etc., focused on community health needs.
      • Multiple synchronous small and large group sessions to review progress and offer additional didactic information.
           
    • Didactics Overview
      • Patient Safety - Dr. Tsilimingras
        • case-based discussion – See one then do one
        • One case DT demonstrates concepts
        • One case Scholar demonstrates concepts
           
      • Transitions of Care - Dr. Gibson-Scipio
        • One case WGS demonstrating concepts – AAP Case
        • One case Scholar demonstrates concepts – Asthma
        • Students create a logic model
           

    Learning Activities

    • Practice Transformation Pre-Test:  This is one method we are using to measure the success of the Program. There are 16 multiple choice questions to complete. Pick the one correct answer
    • Practice Transformation Learning Activity: This is an introductory series on concepts of quality improvement, patient safety, leadership in health care, and patient-centeredness. There are a total of 14 different mini-courses that you are required to complete.
       
      • Quality Improvement 
        • Improvement Capability – this is a short required module
        • Introduction to Health Care Improvement 
        • How to Improve with the Model for Improvement 
        • Testing and Measuring Changes with PDSA Cycles
        • Interpreting Data: Run Charts, Control Charts, and other Measurement Tools 
        • Leading Quality Improvement 
           
      • Patient Safety 
        • Introduction to Patient Safety 
        • From Error to Harm 
        • Human Factors and Safety 
        • Teamwork and Communication in a Culture of Safety 
        • Responding to Adverse Events
           
      • Leadership 
        • Introduction to Health Care Leadership
           
      • Person- and Family-Centered Care 
        • Introduction to Person- and Family-Centered Care
           
      • Triple Aim for Populations 
        • Introduction to the Triple Aim for Populations
           
    • Know my Health Profession (2 parts): To begin transforming our health care system, the health professions must know their role in the system and other healthcare professions. This aids in increasing understanding and appreciation of the training and skills necessary to work together to improve health care outcomes.  
    • Team-Based Quality Improvement project: All year two students will be divided into teams of 4-5 to complete group practice transformation topics.  
    • Team Peer and Self-Assessment Form: To assist with team facilitation, each member will complete a peer evaluation of themselves and other team members. This anonymous to all team members. This Peer Evaluation Assignment will be on Moodle. 
    • Practice Transformation Post-Test: This is one method we are using to measure the success of the Program. There are 16 multiple choice questions to complete. Pick the one correct answer.
       

    Reflection and Resources Assignment 

    Fourth-year students will self-identify an agency that serves families in Kalamazoo. Students will complete the appropriate paperwork to perform 8-hours of service at their self-identified agency. After completing their 8-hours of service, they will address the seven Key Questions in a personal reflection.

    To create and maintain a Social Determinants of Health Library, we ask that each student complete a one-page guided reflection summarizing their experiences during their service hours. The purpose of this assignment is to marshal all the information regarding the numerous community resources into one living document that can be shared among professionals in our community. Students are asked to respond to the following questions regarding their experiences during community assignments. Although students are encouraged to freely express their experiences, we ask that you make this document a constructive one that can serve as a resource for current and future professionals. 

    Key Questions: 

    • Name of agency where you completed your hours?
    • Target population served by this agency?
    • What primary services are offered?
    • Was there a focus on any preventive services?
    • If yes, please explain the prevention services offered.
    • How did your expectations compare with your experiences? 
    • How has your attitude/perception changed about the target population served?
    • What impact does this agency/ program have on the community? 


    Fourth-year students will create a poster on their agency to be presented at the WMed Interprofessional Primary Care Poster Day in April. The posters must provide a detailed description of the agency, the population served, available recourses, and the overall student experiences during their 8-hours of service. Poster presentations will be archived into the Social Determinants of Health Library available for use by WMed physicians who can use this information to guide patient referrals when additional support is needed.

    Tracking of Student Progress and Feedback 

    Check-ins (Nov, Jan, Mar, April): Each scholar completes a standardized form reflecting on their didactic and experiential learning activities. Each Check-in will ascertain the Scholars' integration with their clinical practices.

    The Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusiveness will be in charge of tracking the Program requirements in  conjunction with the WMU AHEC office. They will also work in conjunction with the Department of Family and Community Medicine to be a host site for the clinical training and Gryphon place to assist with student placement for community agency volunteer hours. 

    There is no additional cost to students for participation in the Program. Financial support is available for students to attend a conference to present their scholarly project and will occur through an application process through Student Affairs. Conference travel is supported through a partnership with the AHEC national program.

  • Medical Ethics, Humanities, and Law Distinction Program

    Contact:ethics@wmed.edu

    The aim of the WMed Medical Ethics, Humanities, and Law Distinction Program is to provide advanced education and training in medical ethics, health humanities, or health law. Those who complete the track will be prepared to contribute to and provide leadership in those disciplines and conduct relevant scholarship.

    Application Process/Eligibility

    • Eligibility is open to all medical students in good academic standing at WMed.
    • Admission consideration will not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familiar status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance.
    • Application Process: Applications are accepted through the link posted to the Course Catalog.  All applicants must meet with the DMEHL faculty prior to acceptance into Distinction Program to review commitment, requirements, and expectations. Contact ethics@wmed.edu for more information and to set-up meetings.

    Application Deadline

    Students must apply to the program prior to starting their third year of medical school.

    Requirements

    • All requirements of the Distinction Program are to be met prior to graduation.
    • In order to receive a Distinction in Medical Ethics, Humanities & Law and demonstrate leadership in this field, students will, at a minimum:
      • Foundations: Readings in the foundations in medical ethics, humanities, and law
      • Courses: Completion of six (6) credits of MEHL Electives.
        • NB: 7000 Electives: 0 .5 credits/week; 9000 Electives: 1.0 credits/week
      • Engagement: Attendance at ten (10) MEHL extracurricular functions, such as: MEHL Tuesday Seminar Series, MEHL Grand Rounds, Conversations in Clinical Ethics (Bronson), Bioethics at the Movies, Bioethics on Tap, HEART of WMed, or others with Director approval
      • Scholarship: A scholarly product, such as a research or quality improvement project, in-depth case analysis, leading to an abstract, presentation, or manuscript suitable for an academic conference or peer-reviewed journal.
      • Public Engagement: Lead a discussion (under the mentorship of a MEHL Faculty) on a topic relevant to this Academic Distinction program. This requirement may be satisfied by a presentation at an academic conference, leading a MEHL Tuesday Seminar Series session, another presentation approved by Director


    Oversight

    • The Co-Chairs of the Department of Medical Ethics, Humanities, and Law and their administrative support will track the Distinction Program requirements and will work in conjunction with interested faculty willing to serve as advisors on students’ scholarly product.
    • Students will meet with the distinction director at least once per term. For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.
    • When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.
    • Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.


    Successful Completion of the Program

    Upon successful completion of the Distinction Program, students will be awarded a certificate of distinction in Medical Ethics, Humanities, and Law. This distinction will be included in the student’s Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE or Dean’s Letter), noted in the graduation program, and presentation of this certificate will take place at an annual awards ceremony.

  • Promoting Excellence in Medical Education Distinction Program

    Contacts: Kelsey Temprine, PhD | Peter Vollbrecht, PhD
    kelsey.temprine@wmed.edu | peter.vollbrecht@wmed.edu

    Many students begin medical school with previous experience as educators and wish to further develop and apply their interests and skills. Other students develop interest in the pedagogy of medical education while they are students.

    Purpose

    This academic distinction seeks to identify students with a passion for medical education and pedagogy and foster their development and skills to support their life-long engagement and excellence as educators. In addition, this distinction will permit the medical school to leverage students’ experience, interest, and unique insight to support continuous quality improvement in the medical curriculum. 

    Objectives

    • Describe the roles of a medical educator
    • Define outcome-based education
    • Compare and contrast various educational methods used in medical education including TBL, CBL, PBL, Lecture, Simulation, and group work
    • Compare and contrast the various educational strategies that can be used in education curriculum design
    • Discuss the principles of effective student learning (FAIR)
    • Describe the various methods used for medical education assessment (MCQ, OSCE, WBA, Portfolios)
    • Develop educational content utilizing appropriate pedagogical techniques
    • Dissect the strengths and weaknesses of current medical education literature and research
    • Apply the scientific method to produce scholarship in medical education
    • Describe the importance of life-long learning and quality improvement in medical education
    • Reflect on educational experiences and personal strengths and weaknesses in medical education


    Application Process and Eligibility

    Application to this program is open to all students in the first three years of the medical curriculum who are in good academic standing as defined in the student policy manual.  The program will not discriminate based on race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familial status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance.

    All applicants meet with one of the directors prior to acceptance into the program to review commitment, requirements, and expectations. 

    Application Deadline

    Students must apply prior to the start of their fourth year.

    Requirements

    • Completion of Foundational Curriculum
      • Online modules containing videos and literature-based readings and activities 
      • Individual modules will be assessed by quizzes and/or reflection
         
    • Participation in WMed Medical Education Journal Club
      • Attendance at a minimum of eight meetings during years 1-4
      • Serve as the presenter at a journal club, likely during years 1-3
      • Serve as near-peer mentor for a presenting student during your 4th year  
      • Journal club presenters will receive individual feedback from a faculty member
          
    • Participation in a Medical Education research project
      • Project approved by program directors  
      • Submission and delivery of a Research Day presentation, and when possible, a conference poster/presentation and/or peer reviewed publication of project 
      • Feedback on the student research project will come from the faculty research mentor
         
    • Develop content that can be utilized in an undergraduate medical education course based on principles learned in this distinction
      • Content may include an asynchronous learning module or an active learning session for anticipated utilization in UME (must be approved through program directors and relevant course directors)
      • The student is required to develop 5 USMLE style multiple choice examination questions for their learning event
      • The student will receive feedback from the distinction directors and/or the relevant course director on their prepared content and MCQs 
    • Deliver and lead in-person educational content in the foundational sciences
      • At least 2 unique events: CBL, TBL, lab event, K-12 teaching, and/or simulation (must be pre-approved by distinction directors)
      • Content does not have to be developed by the student 
      • Reflection on delivery, recording of event, and student evaluations 
      • Student observed by faculty with feedback to follow
         
    • Deliver in-person education content in the clinic during clerkships (One event pre-approved by distinction directors)
      • Possible events could occur during advanced hospital rotations (i.e. Morning Report), Monthly Grand Rounds, Family Medicine clerkship, Sub-internships, Transitions Courses 7900 or 9100, Multisystems or Simulation, etc.
      • Reflection on delivery, recording of event, and student evaluations
      • Student observed by faculty with feedback to follow​​​​​


    Additional Recommended (but not Required) Electives

    • MEDU 7510 – Selected Topics in Medical Education
    • MEDU 7513 – Educational Research – The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
    • MEDU 7515 – Animated Presentations in Medical Education


    Tracking of Student Progress and Feedback 

    • Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.
    • For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. The distinction directors will provide guidance about how to successfully complete the elective
    • Each component of the distinction program has built in assessment and feedback processes to ensure that students are receiving the feedback needed for growth. 
    • When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.
    • Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.
  • Well-Being in Medicine Distinction Program

    Contact: Karen Horneffer-Ginter, PhD
    karen.horneffer-ginter@wmed.edu  

    The Well-Being in Medicine Distinction Program (the WBM Program) at WMed serves as a longitudinal elective co-curricular program in which eligible students may enroll in addition to their medical education to receive a distinction in Well-Being in Medicine.

    While the terms well-being and wellness are often used interchangeably to refer to a variety of topic areas, the WBM Program references a modified version of Brady et al., 2018 conceptual definition of wellness: Quality of life, which includes the absence of ill-being and the presence of positive physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being experienced in connection with activities and environments that allow community members to develop their full potential across personal and work-life domains.

    Purpose

    Well-being and burnout prevention have received increasing amounts of attention in recent years given concerns regarding rates of distress among practicing physicians as well as residents and medical students. In 2014, the “quadruple” vs. “triple” aim was advocated to highlight the equal importance of clinicians’ experiences, along with patients’ experiences, health care costs, and outcomes. Recent focus has also been given to the importance of restoring “meaning” in medicine and including the arts in medical education as ways of fostering resilience. “Well-being in medicine” has become a growing field of scholarly research, curricular development, and animated discourse regarding such debates as the comparable merits of wellness programming aimed at the organizational vs. individual level. Now, more than ever, there is a need for medical school graduates to be prepared to support their own wellness and to participate in scholarly conversations regarding provider and patient well-being. In addition, we need physicians who are equipped to step up as decision makers and leaders in order to advance this multi-faceted field and advocate for needed systemic changes in the field of medicine. 

    The WBM Program focuses on knowledge and skill development in four content areas: 

    • Professional & Personal Well-Being Strategies 
    • Mind-Body Medicine 
    • Well-Being Promotion in Patient Care/Well-Being Advocacy in the Medical System 
    • The Arts, Humanities, and Spirituality in Medicine 


    The Program offers interested students an opportunity to: 

    • Expand the breadth of their knowledge across these content areas
    • Deepen their studies regarding one or two wellness topics of interest
    • Demonstrate well-being leadership by contributing toward a culture of wellness, organizationally, at WMed and in future work/community settings.


    Application Process & Eligibility 

    • Eligibility is open to all students in good academic standing at WMed.
    • The WBM Program will not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity/national origin, creed, color, religion, gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, veteran status, genetic or family medical information, height, weight, marital status, familiar status, or any other status protected by applicable law or local ordinance.
    • The WBM Program will be promoted during medical school interviews, on the WMed website, and during Transitions to Medical School.
    • Students are eligible to apply at any point prior to the end of third year. This process will include an intent to participate form including a plan that may change as needed. Should participants need to drop from the Program due to eligibility concerns or otherwise, they may re-apply at any time.

    Application Deadline

    Students must apply prior to the start of their fourth year.

    Requirements

    The requirements of the Program are to be met prior to graduation with some completed prior to the end of third year and a clear plan in place to finish all requirements over the following year.


    In order to receive a Distinction in Well-Being in Medicine and demonstrate leadership in this field, students will, at a minimum:

    • Create one deliverable product which can include but is not limited to a scholarly project (original research, review article or book chapter, etc.), professional presentation (research posters, oral presentations, publications, etc.), health product (pamphlet, educational material, etc.) or device creation. Students can work on and submit this product individually or collaboratively in small teams.
    • Create an online wellness educational module (at least one hour of content) to be added to the library of “well-being in medicine” enduring materials at WMed. Students are also encouraged to deliver this programming in-person either at WMed or within the larger community. Faciliation of an elective course (if not used toward elective credit) can also be used as a way of meeting this requirement.
    • Complete four of the following following elective options, with any modification to be made at the discretion of the supervising faculty advisor.
      • Noontime Educational Events: Attend six Wellness “Noontime Events” (either in person or by watching a recording and writing a reflection paper). Please note that individual Noontime Educational Events can count for either MEDU credit or toward the Distinction elective.
         
      • Explorations in Professional/Personal Well-Being
        • (M1/M2 MEHL 7523 [was MEHL 7510 – 13])
           
      • Mind-Body Medicine
        • (M1/M2 6-week longitudinal elective, hybrid in-person & online, or 10-week in person MEHL 7519 [was MEHL 7510 – 9])
           
      • Spirituality and Medicine
        • (online elective MEHL 7525 [was MEHL 7510 – 15]/MEHL 9560]
           
      • Emotional Awareness and Well-Being Skills in the Clinic (MEHL 9590)
      • Well-Being Promotion & Advocacy
        • (M4 elective MEHL 9550)
           
      • Facilitation of an Elective Course (e.g., MEHL 7519, MEHL 9590)
      • MEHL Elective (which informs a student’s chosen wellness area of focus)
      • Independent Study (which can be used to support additional study, research, or student-led wellness initiatives such as the Wellness Interest Group, MESS)
         
      • Other Electives, by permission, that pertain to the student’s interest in wellness
         
    • Students will be offered an option of being paired with a WMed or Community Faculty member who will serve as a mentor to offer support in integrating wellness into one’s personal and professional life.


    Oversight and Cost

    • The Associate Dean for Culture, Chief Wellness Officer will be in charge of tracking the Program requirements and will work in conjunction with interested faculty willing to serve as advisors on students’ capstone projects.
    • Students will meet with the distinction director at least once per term. For Term 1, students must meet with the director before the start of November. For Term 2, students must meet with the director before April. Students are required to update their copy of the Student Checklist as they progress through the distinction program. The student and director will initial the checklist to indicate their progress during each term.
    • When students are starting their fourth year, the student and director will initial the checklist to indicate the student is on track to complete all distinction components by their graduation date. The initialed checklist must be submitted by the student to Educational Affairs by July 1st, in the beginning of the fourth year. This initialed checklist is required to receive distinction inclusion on the MSPE.
    • Students and directors must sign a copy of the checklist, signifying all requirements of the distinction program have been met by March 15th of their fourth year. The director will submit the signed checklist to Educational Affairs. A completed checklist must be in hand to be awarded the distinction at graduation.
       

    Successful Completion of the Program

    Upon successful completion of the Program as outlined in section 3, students will be awarded a certificate of distinction in Well-Being in Medicine. This distinction will be outlined in the student’s Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE or Dean’s Letter), noted in the graduation program, and presentation of this certificate will take place at an annual awards ceremony.